Ofcom's yearly report – A quick look at the NI numbers

For the 5th year running, Ofcom have split off from the main report, number’s relating to our little country, better known as Northern Ireland and they make for some interesting reading.

37% of households now use some form of social networking site

38% watch TV online and some

15% make voice and or video calls over the Internet.

72% of rural homes now have a broadband connection, compared to 69% in urban area’s

90% of rural homes have a mobile phone, compared to 87% in urban area’s (seeing a trend here) and

51% of rural homes have a satellite TV connection compared to only 40% in urban area’s

Coverage for 3G was only 40 per cent, well below the UK average of 87 per cent and represented the lowest figure among the UK nations

The use of mobile broadband has increased by 6 per cent from last year and is now used in 14 per cent of all homes

The figures are great but it’s only when you start to digest them properly that you begin to put a picture together.  In the 4th year of the results NI only began to catch up with the UK, this year, in many fields we have excelled as a ‘switched on’ nation.  The frustration for me lies with the Governement of NI, which continue to push the big telco’s to invest in urban communications such as high speed broadband and 3G roll out, yet looking at the figures people in rural area’s are more likely to uptake of the services.  Let’s face it, we have a small country and we only have two big cities (if you can even call them that, Manchester has more residents that the whole of NI).

The world is changing, the world has changed.  I’m happy to see that NI has embraced the era of communicatons (at long last) but come on, give us some investment Arlene, give us some respect.  We (speaking as a rural resident) don’t want to truck into the city for a decent broadband speed and a usable mobile phone data signal !

You can read the full report here.

Russell

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One Comment on “Ofcom's yearly report – A quick look at the NI numbers”

  1. To be fair to Ofcom, it’s not that the NI report is split off from the main one, but they produce individual ones for England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, as well as the UK-wide one.

    The 3G (lack of) coverage does stand out as the starkest discontinuity in our local communications. Despite the geographical hardships and sparse populations in northern Wales and the Scottish Highlands, they don’t come off so badly.


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